Artist Interview - Kellie Everton

Artist interview between Shannon Skye Robinson and Lois Emma Harkin (Curating Futures Project Coordinator), and Kellie Everton (Curating Futures Artist).


* Warning, mature content- nudity *


Date of Interview: 20th of December 2021

Participants: Shannon Skye Robinson (SSR) and Lois Emma Harkin (LEH) and Kellie Everton (KE)



SSR/LEH: What is your background?


KE: I am a multimedia artist with a background in SFX, Face and Body painting, concentrating now on my art practice, which concerns collective memory and how objects, monuments, and the ruin

undermine the stable notion of the past and influence its fixity.

This work lays roots in my site visit to the Chernobyl exclusion zone, a fascination with Reality

through Philosophy and the deconstruction of 'monuments'

 

SSR/LEH: How did you get into art/ creativity?

KE: From an early age, but perhaps not in a traditional sense, I was amazed by historical buildings/people, different cultural narratives, and ideologies. It was not till my first year at The University of Derby that I realised my childhood pursuits were, in fact, art-based and relevant to my practice as an artist.


Artwork produced by Kellie Everton


 

SSR/LEH: What do you get out of producing work?

KE: Inside my head is the equivalent of a glass house with a bombardment of bouncy ball-shaped ideas and distractions. The pros and cons of having ADHD, now and then, a window needs opening to allow a few to escape and let in new ones. Producing work in abundance helps to relieve the chaos.


Artwork produced by Kellie Everton


 

SSR/LEH: How do you want your work to be perceived by an audience?

KE: Mainly for the audience to question. Questions are good. We should all keep looking at the world with childlike curiosity, never take anything at face value. Take the time for discovery and see through the eyes of others.

Artwork produced by Kellie Everton


 

SSR/LEH: Who are your biggest inspirations?

KE: Valerie Hegarty, I came across her work four years ago now and not one piece I produce that is not in some way inspired by her fantastic work.


Artwork produced by Kellie Everton


 

SSR/LEH: What are the main concepts or themes you explore within your work?


KE: Historical permanence, Monumentality, Untold narratives. Reality.


 

SSR/LEH: What is the main thing you have learnt through your creative practice?


KE: To have faith in myself and my practice, the more I learn, the more I don't understand, and that's a good thing. That in art, it's not all about the end goal its to be cheesy the journey and the happy mistakes that happen on the way, which lead you down a rabbit hole.


 

SSR/LEH: Who is your work for? Yourself? A small community? A specific sector of society? Or is it for everyone?

KE: I create for me firstly because I enjoy the process. Otherwise, I may as well be on a production line creating mediocre work on mass that I have no love for. After it has been produced, the work is no longer mine, regardless of my initial intent. It becomes a reflection of the spectator, whoever that may be.


 

SSR/LEH: What is the best piece of advice you could give to another artist, or someone just starting out in the creative sector?

KE: Keep going, although that does not mean to keep physically making working and producing, there will be times you question your practice and yourself or just have a mental block, but just sitting and reflecting, reading, visiting galleries/museums, watching films is still a vital part of any practice. It took me a long time to appreciate that. I'd spend hours sitting and staring, thinking I was failing because I didn't know what to do, but then inspiration would come from taking a walk or watching the latest Marvel film, always somewhere unexpected.



 

SSR/LEH: Why did you decide to join the Curating Futures community?


KE: This year, I've made it my goal to interact more with other artists, collaborate more, and create a strong support network of creatives to be inspired by.



 

You can find Kellie Everton via her Instagram